The grateful and undemanding Tagetes (African Marigold) flower originates from Mexico

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The Tagetes or Cadaver flower (Latin Tagetes) originates from Mexico. This ornamental plant has long been cultivated in Europe and around the world. It is an annual plant. This flower is also one of your favorite flowering plants in gardens. Tagetes or Cadaver flower types are divided into high and low. The low ones have smaller trees and smaller flowers so they are suitable for growing in the garden. Tall types of cadaver are used in the flower business as cut flowers. They can be grown in the garden or on the balcony with special care.
Tagetes or Cadaver leaves resemble fern leaves. The flowers are plush in texture and various colors. Tagetes blooms for a long time from early June until the early first frosts. It is sown along curbs when grown in gardens. Tagetes blooms in all yellow and orange flowers and painted in both colors. Tall types of cadaver produce large flowers (up to 12 cm). The lower types of cadaver yield flowers of 4 to 5 centimetres. The flowers can be simple or duplicate. Earlier types of cadaver had a strong odor. Then the breeders called them “stinkers”. New types of cadaver have a weaker odor.
tagetes loves the usual garden land. She likes to be exposed to the sun. It grows into a bush up to 70 cm high. The height of this flower depends on the species you have sown. If you want a tall cadaver, secure it with supports. Tagetes is sown independently at intervals of 20 to 30 cm. May survive in combination with other flowers. So you get an interesting garden or balcony arrangement. Tagetes is a grateful flower for its care and maintenance. There is not much work to do about growing this flower. You need to remove the dried flowers regularly. The Tagetes will continue to flourish and flourish. Water this flower regularly, especially during the summer months.
Tagetes does not belong to medicinal plants. However, the effect of cadaver tea is known to combat uterine fibroid.
cover photo: http://www.pixabay.com

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