Autumn fallen leaves protect plant roots from freezing (8 tips)


The leaves that we can see all around us during the autumn months should not be burned or removed from the yard. Many backyard owners often drop fallen leaves to clear and clean the yard. This method pollutes the environment and is not recommended.
Gardening tips for using dry and fallen leaves:

  1. Dry leaves should not be removed from the yard or burned because it protects the roots of plants from freezing.
  2. The soil through which air and water pass becomes loose. The roots can then grow freely.
  3. Land that has not frozen (after the snow has receded) absorbs melted snow well.
  4. Fallen leaves also do not allow moisture to evaporate from the soil and prevent erosion.
  5. Fallen leaves are a natural material. With rot, it becomes a precious fertilizer that worms adore.
  6. If the leaves remain on the ground, after a few years the soil will become dark, loose and moist in that place. It will contain many nutrients, necessary for the development of trees. This natural fertilizer contains nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus, calcium and other useful elements.
  7. If fallen leaves bother you on the lawn, gardeners suggest you pick it up and put it on one pile. Later, you can put rose cuttings and other waste from the garden, but also from the kitchen, on that pile. Add plenty of salt and let stand until spring. The leaves will gradually rot and turn into wonderful compost that becomes the real strength of the garden.
  8. Some gardeners make high beds in which they keep the mentioned leaves and waste from the kitchen (potato peelings, bananas, apples, etc.). They cover everything with straw. In the spring on this compost plant lettuce, radishes, onions and other crops.

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