Useful Japanese technique “Sashiko” with which the old textile got a new look

nl.pinterest.com

The Japanese are known for devising various ways to repair pottery, clothing, and various items. Thus, in Japan, a creative way of repairing old textile clothes or clothing items was devised. This technique is called the Sashiko handmade technique (刺し子, literally “little stabs” or “little pierce”). So from an old and unusable item of clothing you get a brand new item. In this way, the pollution of the environment and the natural environment is significantly reduced. It is known that the fashion industry is one of the biggest polluters of the planet Earth.


Sashiko is a technique similar to a work of art because embroidery consists of geometric shapes. It is important to follow a few rules: the colors should create contrast, the spacing between the seams should be uniform and should not intersect.


8 guidelines of Sashiko handicraft technique (basic guidelines):

  1. It is necessary to make a sketch (draw a pattern) according to which the embroidery will be made. We then turn the sketch into a work using various pieces of fabric. These pieces should be put on a piece of clothing.
  2. The best option is to sew directly to save time. We can additionally use sewing on the fabric we add to get a “cool look” on jeans (on torn parts) or on a jeans jacket.
  3. In the sashiko technique, it is important to sew from the front and follow the rules of spacing and cutting.
  4. It is important to sew by hand because that way we have control over the lines that we would not be able to follow skillfully with the help of a sewing machine.
  5. Classic geometric squares, triangles, circles or unusual flowers can be made.
  6. At the end of sewing the whole procedure should be repeated on the same part, but in reverse order.
  7. This completes the repair of the clothes with the sashiko technique of hand sewing.
  8. With this technique you can repair / decorate scarves, shawls, bags, hats, pillows, blankets and other textile items.

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s